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Thursday, April 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service found in the catalog.

The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service

Helena Mary Chew

The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service

by Helena Mary Chew

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  • 13 Currently reading

Published by H. Milford, Oxford university press in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Land tenure,
  • Church lands,
  • Scutage,
  • Feudalism,
  • History

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD594 .C5
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, [1], 203, [1] p.
    Number of Pages203
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26538430M
    LC Control Number32031148

    Fulk FitzWarin (x – c. ), variant spellings (Latinized Fulco filius Garini), the third (Fulk III), was a prominent representative of a marcher family associated especially with estates in Shropshire (on the English border with Wales) and at Alveston in young life (c. ), early in the reign of King John (–), he won notoriety as the outlawed. Knight's Fee - In theory, a fief which provided sufficient revenue to equip and support one knight. This was approximately twelve hides or acres, although the term applies more to revenue a fief could generate than its size; it required about thirty marks per year to support a knight. Launder - A person (of either sex) who washes linen. Chapter 2 mentioned that the tenants-in-chief held ‘by knight service’. The same chapter also referred to ‘the whole fee [ feodum ] of a knight’. This meant a fee for which the service of one knight was owed when the king summoned out his army. This book is intended to illustrate the relations of the English Church with the papacy and with the English State down to the revolt of Wyclif against the abuses which had gathered round the ecclesiastical system of the Middle Ages, and the Great Schism in the papacy which materially affected the ideas of the whole of Western Christendom.

    The chief sources of information for the extent and development of knight-service are the returns (cartae) of the barons (i.e. the tenants-in-chief) in , informing the king, at his request, of the names of their tenants by knight-service with the number of fees they held, supplemented by the payments for “scutage” (see Scutage) recorded. So too, in France there was the cour du roy, dating from the earliest Capetian times, the court of the king's demesne or immediate tenants; at this royal court, whether in England or in France, all the tenants-in-chief, at any rate in the days of the full force of feudalism, were obliged to attend. The same court existed in the Holy Roman. Arnulf de Montgomery (born c; died ×) was an Anglo-Norman magnate. He was a younger son of Roger de Montgomery and Mabel de 's father was a leading magnate in Normandy and England, and played an active part in the Anglo-Norman invasion of Wales in the late eleventh century. Following the Montgomerys' successes against the Welsh, Arnulf established Born: c   The king was looked up to as the real possessor of the land of the nation. By him, as representing the nation, baronies, manors, knight’s fees, fiefs were distributed to the tenants-in-chief, and they, in turn, divided their land to be held in trust by the lower vassals (Vinogradoff, English Society in the Eleventh Century, 42).

    While tenure of land in return for services had existed in England before the conquest, William revolutionized the upper ranks of English society by dividing the country among about Norman tenants-in-chief and innumerable mesne (intermediate) tenants, all holding their fiefs by knight service. The result, the almost total replacement of the. flemish tenants-in-chief in domesday england 7 5 1 (57% of the honour's total) would indicate. Scampton, Baumber, Edenham and Culverthorpe, all four in Lincolnshire, were the only demesne manors where the value in was higher than the value before Cited by: 2. Domesday Book (/ ˈ d uː m z d eɪ / or US: / ˈ d oʊ m z d eɪ /; Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in by order of King William the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:Language(s): Medieval Latin. abbot action alienation amerced ancient demesne Anglo-Saxon assize bailiffs barons become bishop borough bound Bracton burgesses called canons charter church claim clerk common law Conquest corporation county court crown custom demesne Domesday Book doubt duty Earl ecclesiastical Edward I.'s England English law exchequer feoffment feudal 4/5(1).


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The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service by Helena Mary Chew Download PDF EPUB FB2

The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service: especially in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.

Chew, Helena M. THE ENGLISH ECCLESIASTICAL The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service book AND KNIGHT SERVICE ESPECIALLY IN THE THIRTEENTH AND FOURTEENTH CENTURIES.

London: Oxford University Press, First Edition. Free tenant / Rating: % positive. This was to diminish the possibility of sub-vassals being employed by tenants-in-chief against the crown.

In the great feudal survey Domesday Book (), tenants-in-chief were listed first in each English county's entry. The lands held by a tenant-in-chief in England, if comprising a large feudal barony, were called an honour. The English Ecclesiastical Tenants-in-Chief and Knight Service, Especially in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries, Oxford University Press, Chibnall, Marjorie ‘Dating the Charters of the Smaller Religious Houses in Suffolk in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries’, in Gervers, Michael, ed., Dating Undated Medieval Charters Author: J.

Kaye. 7For discussions of the motives of lords in giving out land, see Helena M. Chew, The English Ecclesiastical Tenants-in-Chief and Knight Service (London, ), pp. ; Painter, English Feudal Barony, pp.

; J. Bean, The Decline of English Feudalism,  , The English Ecclesiastical Tenants-in-Chief and Knight Service (Oxford, ), p. For the details of Henry II's first scutage see Hunter, Joseph (ed.) Pipe Roll 2 The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service book II [Record Commission] (London, ).

Miss Chew mistakenly dates this roll (rede, ).Cited by: 3. 2 I am using tenure of land 'by knight service' in the contemporary sense to describe a particular form of tenure. It does not follow that knight service The English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service book its most important element.

See J. Bean, The Decline of English Feudalism (Manchester, ), ; and, for fuller discussion, below pp. 33, Tenant-in-chief is a modern coinage which, 'like many other supposedly technical terms of feudalism, seems to be a creation of medievalists rather than of the middle ages' (Reynolds, Fiefs, page ).

By convention, tenants-in-chief are those landowners who held their. Entry for 'Knight-Service' - Encyclopedia Britannica - One of 8 Bible encyclopedias freely available, this resource contained over 40 million words in nea articles written by 1, respected authors. United Kingdom - United Kingdom - The Normans (–): The Norman Conquest has long been argued about.

The question has been whether William I introduced fundamental changes in England or based his rule solidly on Anglo-Saxon foundations.

A particularly controversial issue has been the introduction of feudalism. On balance, the debate has favoured dramatic change while also granting. The chief sources of information for the extent and development of knight-service are the returns (cartae) of the barons (i.e. the tenants-in-chief) ininforming the king, at his request, of the names of their tenants by knight-service with the number of fees they held, supplemented by the payments for scutage recorded on the pipe rolls.

Knight-service was the dominant and distinctive tenure of land as a fief associated with a knight under the English feudal system. Early history. It is associated in its origin with that development in warfare which made the mailed horseman, armed with lance and sword, the most important factor in was long believed that knight-service was developed out of the liability, under the.

Chew, H.M. English ecclesiastical tenants-in-chief and knight service () Chibnall, A.C. Sherington: fiefs and fields of a Buckinghamshire village () Chibnall, A.C.

Beyond Sherington: the early history of the region of Buckinghamshire lying to the north-east of Newport Pagnell () Chibnall, Marjorie.

Anglo-Norman England, (). Define tenant-in-chief. tenant-in-chief synonyms, tenant-in-chief pronunciation, tenant-in-chief translation, English dictionary definition of tenant-in-chief.

n a tenant who held some or all of his lands directly from the king. Tenant Multiple Listing Service; Tenant now in jail; Tenant of the demesne. First published inSir Frederick Pollock and Frederic William Maitland&#;s legal classic The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I expanded the work of Sir Edward Coke and William Blackstone by exploring the origins of key aspects of English common law and Book Edition: In Two Volumes.

The History of English Law, Volume 1. serjeanty owed by the kings tenants in chief Serjeanties due borough Bracton burgesses canons charter church claim clerk common law Conquest corporation county court crown custom demesne Domesday Book Earl ecclesiastical Edward I.'s England English law exchequer eyre feoffment feudal frankalmoin.

The military obligations of the English people (Book A). - Dartmouth Borough Records (DD). Guildford. The English Ecclesiastical Tenants in Chief and Knight Service (). The Financial Aspects of ().

The Historie of Wyates Rebellion Author: John Jeremy Goring. Scholarly review published by H-Net Reviews. Beyond Catastrophe or Continuity. The Norman Conquest is a topic of endless fascination, whether what is at issue is the military campaign itself or the question of how different England, Britain, and, indeed, the world might be even today if the event had not occurred.

The Knights of England The Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, and Ireland, and of Knights Bachelors BY WM.

SHAW, LITT.D. Editor of the Calendar of Treasury Papers at H.M. Record Office ; Author of the History of the English Church. Even before the Norman Conquest, there was a strong tradition of landholding in Anglo-Saxon William the Conqueror asserted sovereignty over England inhe confiscated the property of the recalcitrant English landowners.

Over the next dozen years, he granted land to his lords and to the dispossessed Englishmen, or affirmed their existing land holdings, in exchange for fealty and.

PAGE. PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION v. PREFACE TO THE Pdf EDITION. vi. TABLE Pdf CONTENTS. vii BOOK I. SKETCH OF EARLY ENGLISH LEGAL HISTORY.

CHAPTER I. THE DARK AGE IN LEGAL HISTORY, pp. 1– § 3. Knight’s Service, pp. – Military tenure, Growth and decay of military tenure Units of military service, English Ecclesiastical Tenants-In-Chief and Knight Service ().

English Noblemen and their advisors: consultation and collaboration in the later Middle Ages',Author: Lisa L. Ford.Audio Books ebook Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion.

Librivox Free Audiobook. The scutage and knight service in England." See other formats.